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Wine Economics Part III: Reputation

Wine Economics Part III: Reputation

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” The Bard strikes to the heart again. In many ways, the first two posts on Wine Economics (Part I and Part II) danced around the importance of reputation. Today, we will hit the nail squarely on the head. Haut-Brion, Romanee-Conti, Screaming Eagle (can you tell which winery is in the United States?), Margaux. Want a taste? Go take out a loan first….

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Wine Economics Part II: Varietals

Wine Economics Part II: Varietals

The New World has successfully managed to bring the names of specific grapes (a.k.a. varietals) to the forefront of our minds. Most Old World wines did not traditionally include varietal labeling, opting instead for location specific labeling–Pauillac, Rioja, or Barolo, for example. While much of the Old World continues this original labeling strategy, today I will focus on the varietals within the bottles, regardless of location, and their effect on the bottle price. If you have not┬áread Wine Economics Part…

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Wine Economics Part I: The Land

Wine Economics Part I: The Land

Why can I buy a solid, terroir-nuanced Cabernet Sauvignon from Washington for $18, while I can’t buy an equally alluring Pinot Noir from neighboring Oregon for under $30? Why the huge variety and volume of respectable Languedoc-Roussillon red blends (France) for under $15, while I can’t buy equally unadulterated* cabernet sauvignons for that price from California? These two scenarios only hint at the tip of the economic iceberg when it comes to wine.┬áThe price tag at our local wine shop…

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A Sense of Place

A Sense of Place

Those with a pulse on the wine industry have familiarized themselves with a new additive called Mega Purple, and its brethren Mega “Cherry Shade” and Mega Red. These concentrates are made from the teinturier grape, a lesser known, though massively produced, varietal from the steamy central valley of California. This grape is used to fill portions of bottles under $10 (and often higher priced wine, shhhhh). If your wine provides nothing more specific than “California” as its geographic location, you…

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